India launches "world's cheapest" tablet computer AKASH (35 $)




India finally managed to launch probably world's cheapest 7-inch touchscreen tablet dubbed...


PRICE@1700 rupees (35$)


PROUD TO BE AN INDIAN....PRICE@1700 rupees

1100 for students.

Available in December.

Features of World

Cheapest Tablet Launched by

Indian Government:The tablet

runs on Android 2.2 (Froyo) and

comes with a 7-inch resistive

touchscreen with 800x480

resolution and weighs 350 grams.

The tablet has a 256MB of RAM, a

32GB expandable memory slot

and two USB ports.The tablet

comes with a 12-month

replacement warranty and

supports formats like DOC, DOCX,

PDF and PPTX etc. Aakash has a

standard 3.5mm headphone jack...

*********************
World Cheapest

Tablet:The mighty $35 Indian

Tablet is finally launched in India

on October 5. Kapil Sibal, minister

of communications and

information technology

confirmed.In Indian Rupee, the

price of the tablet is Rs. 1700. The

Indian Government will subsidize

the cost of the tablet and offer it

to students for about Rs. 1100


Aakash tablet has been tailored particularly for university students for learning online v...

Aakash tablet has been tailored particularly for university students for learning online via a government platform



Running Android 2.2 Froyo (which is actually not a tablet-friendly platform), Aakash comes...

Running Android 2.2 Froyo (which is actually not a tablet-friendly platform), Aakash comes with 7-inch 800x480 resistive Multi-touch touchscreen



Aakash tablet is equipped with WiFi, GPRS modem (can serve as a cell phone), two full-size...

Aakash tablet is equipped with WiFi, GPRS modem (can serve as a cell phone), two full-sized USB ports and 3.5mm jack


$35 Tablet By Indian Government To Be Launched On October 5, 2011


The much awaited tablet by the Indian Government is to be released on 5th of October, 2011. This tablet is priced at US $35. That was beyond expectations by everybody in the market. But this proves that with the right kind of planning and execution, anything is possible.
35 USD tablet Device by Indian Government made by HCL cheapest tablet in India subsidized by Indian Government Price features specification review feedback Kapil Sibal India
The tablet was expected to be out in June, 2011. But due to tender by HCL and bank guarantee related issues, the project got delayed and is now finally out.
The Indian Government would be paying 50% of the cost of the device and so any Indian student could avail this tablet at a subsidized price of Rs 1,100 only. There is no information as of now, whether this scheme by the Indian Government would be valid during the launch phase of the product or not.
35 USD tablet Device by Indian Government made by HCL cheapest tablet in India subsidized by Indian Government Price features specification review feedback Kapil Sibal India
Here are the specifications and features of $35 Tablet by Indian Government

$35 Tablet – Price, Features and Specifications

  • Price – Rs 1,100 only
  • 2 GB RAM
  • 32GB HD
  • 2 USB ports
  • Multimedia content
  • 7” Touch-screen
  • Video-conferencing facility
35 USD tablet Device by Indian Government made by HCL cheapest tablet in India subsidized by Indian Government Price features specification review feedback Kapil Sibal
All of us are really very hopeful of the success of this project by the Government. The success of this project would open up a whole new world of possibilities for young Indians. Since the cost barrier would be broken, we could expect many of the startup companies being formed which are based on cutting edge technology to enter into the market. Due to this, India as a whole would further rise in the IT and related fields. The education system in the country would also feel tremendous boost as a result of this project. It would revolutionize the way education has been imparting to students in the country.
Let us see, how successful the Indian Government becomes in implementing and executing this project to truly benefit those who are in need. We hope the best for this project to be successful.



World's cheapest tablet launched





World's cheapest tablet launched in India
NEW DELHI: India's finally got its much hyped ultra-low-cost tablet, Aakash. The government is buying the first units of the device for Rs 2250 each from a British company which is assembling the devices in India. They will initially be given to students for free in a pilot run of 100,000 units.

"The rich have access to the digital world, the poor and ordinary have been excluded. Aakashwill end that digital divide," Telecoms and Education Minister Kapil Sibal said.

The tablet runs on Android 2.2 (Froyo) and comes with a 7-inch resistive touchscreen with 800x480 resolution and weighs 350 grams. The tablet has a 256MB of RAM, a 32GB expandable memory slot and two USB ports.

The tablet comes with a 12-month replacement warranty and supports formats like DOC, DOCX, PDF and PPTX etc. Aakash has a standard 3.5mm headphone jack.

The tablet has a 2100mAh battery which can reportedly last for 2-3 hours depending on the usage. The device is also said to be completely made in India, as according to a review, a sticker at the back emphasises the fact. Aakash also reportedly packs some pre-loaded apps, however, lacks the Android Market Place.

DataWind, the British-based company that developed the tablet, said the cost would drop when mass production begins. The tablet will be commercially available from November for Rs 2999. The commercial version of the tablet would have no duty waivers or subsidy, as in the government's version and come with added features like an inbuilt cellular modem and SIM to access internet.

Initial reactions to the Aakash were mixed, with the mainly middle-class technology department students at the event saying it needed refinement but was a good option for the poor.

"It could be better," said Nikant Vohra, an electrical engineering student. "If you see it from the price only, it's okay, but we have laptops and have used iPads, so we know the difference."

Some 19 million people subscribe to mobile phones every month, making India the world's fastest growing market, but most are from the wealthier segment of the population in towns.

India lags behind fellow BRIC nations Brazil, Russia and China in the drive to get its 1.2 billion population connected to technologies such as the Internet and mobile phones, according to a report by risk analysis firm Maplecroft.

The number of Internet users grew 15-fold between 2000 and 2010, according to another recent report. Still, just 8 per cent of Indians have access. That compares with nearly 40 per cent in China.

Some 19 million people subscribe to mobile phones every month, making India the world's fastest growing market, but most are from the wealthier segment of the population in towns. 


India gets world's cheapest tablet PC
But low-cost computing yet to come of age.
Nearly two years after it announced its intention to launch a low-cost computing device, the Indian government today demoed Aakash, now the world’s lowest priced computing/internet device at $46 (Rs 2,250). Other cheap tablet PC initiatives by private companies include ‘Magnum’ by LACS, a division of the Bangalore-based Devraj group, priced at $99. Beetel of the Bharti group priced its ‘Magiq’ tablet PC at Rs 9,999 ($200) while Reliance Communications’ Reliance 3G Tab costs Rs 12,999 ($265). Aakash, launched by communications and IT minister Kapil Sibal today, is designed, developed and manufactured by DataWind, in partnership with IIT Rajasthan, under the HRD ministry’s Mission on Education Through Information and Communication Technology (NME-ICT).
The government is buying 100,000 tablets from DataWind at an all-inclusive price of $46 (Rs 2,250) a unit. However, under NME-ICT, the target price for 10 million units is Rs 1,750 ($35) a unit. DataWind eventually plans to bring it down to $10 (around Rs 500) a unit.
The Aakash is a seven-inch Android 2.2 touch screen tablet that has an HD video co-processor for a multimedia experience and core graphics accelerator for faster application support, as also DataWind’s UbiSurfer browser. The device includes Wi-Fi connectivity and support for optional 3G modems. Two full-sized USB ports are integrated into the unit allowing pen-drives, external keyboards, webcams, dongles and other inexpensive peripherals to be attached, according to DataWind CEO Suneet Singh Tuli. DataWind is also offering a leather keyboard case with the package.
OTHER LOW-COST PC INITIATIVES
  • Linux-based mobile computer called Mobilis for Rs 10,000
    — Failed
  • Wipro’s Janata PC
    — Failed
  • Simputer
    — Lost steam
  • XO laptops
    — Lost steam
  • The sub-10k PC launched by players such as HCL, Xenitis and others
    — Lost steam
  • NComputing, a desktop virtualisation firm, has shipped so far350,000. Of this, 150,000 have been deployed
  • Novatium’s Nova PC, a thin client-base computing solution, had 40,000 users as of June 2010
  • Also, LACS (Devraj group) for $99; Beetel (Bharti group) for$200; Reliance for $265
The pilot project to test the device on the field will be done by distributing 3,300 devices in each state to post-secondary students. The state coordinators will be identified and field-testing on check-listed parameters will be done. Based on the feedback after 45 days, areas of improvement and innovation will be pondered over and changes brought accordingly.
Although the Aakash tablet will be available only to post-secondary students through NME-ICT, DataWind will offer a commercial version called UbiSlate in late November for Rs 2,999 (inclusive of all duties and taxes). That product will include a cellular modem, allowing it to deliver web access anywhere there is cellular connectivity, and also to function as a mobile phone. Internet access across mobile networks will be priced at Rs 99 for 2 GB.
Sibal said the government was "also doing bulk deals with the National Institute of Speech and Hearing, Kerala". "The ministry is also seeking collaboration with content developers to create world-class content. The move will bridge the gap and bring access to the marginalised and people having limited access to resources," said Sibal. He said the government was in the process of drafting a legislation for that — the Electronic Configuration Bill — to be tabled in Parliament in the coming Winter session.
While low-cost computing initiatives are welcome, analysts say, history reveals they have quickly run out of steam. In May 2005, an Indian technology firm Encore Software announced a Rs 10,000 Linux-based mobile computer. Christened Mobilis, it was powered by an Intel processor, had 128 MB of SDRAM, featured a 7.4-inch LCD screen, roll-up keyboard, touch screen with stylus input, six-hour battery life and a case that opened up as a desktop stand. “This marks India’s leap into the future of PC technology…,” said Kapil Sibal who was then minister for science and technology. Not much has been heard of the Mobilis since.
And does anyone remember the Simputer — the handheld low-cost computing device introduced by Encore (along with PicoPeta)? Over the last eight years, the Simputer has been used by the governments of Karnataka and Chattisgarh and for automobile engine diagnostics (M&M), and tracking of iron-ore movement (Dempo), and (in some cases) by the police to track traffic offenders and issue traffic tickets.
Low-cost computing devices could effectively, and eventually, bridge the “digital divide”. Analysts, however, caution while the move of the government to introduce the $35 computing device is good, what is needed is a strategy to mass market these devices. Besides, the country needs adequate internet (broadband) penetration to make such models a success. The success of a computing model, add analysts, revolves around a friendly operating system (OS), an application-ready device, and a robust distribution model.
Perhaps, the first real answer to the challenge of low-cost computing for kids was the XO (which runs open-source Linux) from Nicholas Negroponte — founder of the One Laptop Per Child (OLPC) project. The original target cost was $100 (about Rs 4,600), but this escalated (including shipping costs) due to design upgrades (more memory and a faster microprocessor) and because the production volumes would not enjoy economies of scale. OLPC has sold two million XO units in 40 countries till date.

Not Sakshat, India launches Aakash, the cheapest tablet PC around


New Delhi: The much awaited India's ultra-low-cost tablet is finally here. The much talked-about $35 tablet has been branded Aakash, and not Sakshat as reported earlier.
The initial cost at which the government is acquiring one lakh units the tablet PC from DataWind is Rs 2250 per unit. The target price at which the government intends to acquire an additional 1 crore units is the previously publicised Rs 1750 per unit.
Powered by Android 2.2 (Froyo) and a 366 Mhz processor the 7-inch tablet has a resistive touch screen. The Aakash tablet is in fact DataWind's UBISlate 7 tablet. Weighing 350 grams the tablet has 256MB RAM and an internal storage of 2GB Flash memory.
The tablet will also be commercially available from November at a price of Rs 2999. A cellular modem will be the additional feature in the commercial model. Some units of the tablet PC were also distributed to the students present at the launch event in New Delhi. The device will initially be made available to post-secondary students.
The Aakash tablet also has support for Wi-Fi connectivity and includes a microphone and stereo earphones. The tablet also comes with a 12-month replacement warranty. The device was first showcased in back in July 2010. The tablet supports additional external memory up to 32 GB and includes an USB port.
A keyboard portfolio case for the tablet will also be made available during the commercial launch at an additional cost of Rs 300.
India trails fellow BRIC nations Brazil, Russia and China in the drive to get its 1.2 billion population connected to technologies such as the Internet and mobile phones, a report by risk analysis firm Maplecroft said this year.
The number of Internet users grew 15-fold between 2000 and 2010, according to another recent report. Still, just 8 per cent of Indians have access. That compares with nearly 40 per cent in China.
Some 19 million people subscribe to mobile phones every month, making India the world's fastest growing market, but most are from the wealthier segment of the population in towns.
The launch last week of Amazon's Kindle Fire shook up the global tablet market, with its $199 price tag and slick browser a serious threat to Apple's iPad.
Like the Kindle Fire, the Aakash uses the Google Android operating system, but market watchers were sceptical the Indian-made device will have mass appeal.
Specifications:
Hardware:
- Processor: 366 Mhz. Connexant with Graphics accelerator and HD Video processor
- Memory (RAM): 256MB RAM / Storage (Internal): 2GB Flash
- Storage (External): 2GB to 32GB Supported
- Peripherals (USB2.0 ports, number): 1 Standard USB port
- Audio out: 3.5mm jack / Audio in: 3.5mm jack
- Display and Resolution: 7" display with 800x480 pixel resolution
- Input Devices: Resistive touch screen
- Connectivity and Networking: GPRS and WiFi IEEE 802.11 a/b/g
- Power and Battery: Up to 180 minutes on battery. AC adapter 200-240 volt range.
Software:
- OS: Android 2.2
- Document Rendering
* Supported Document formats: DOC, DOCX, PPT, PPTX, XLS, XLSX, ODT, ODP
* PDF viewer, Text editor
- Multimedia and Image Display
* Image viewer supported formats: PNG, JPG, BMP and GIF
* Supported audio formats: MP3, AAC, AC3, WAV, WMA
* Supported video formats: MPEG2, MPEG4, AVI, FLV
- Communication and Internet
* Web browser - Standards Compliance: xHTML 1.1 compliant, JavaScript 1.8 compliant
* Separate application for online YouTube video
- Safety and other standards compliance
* CE certification / RoHS certification



India launches cheapest tablet computer


india-tablet
hindinewmovietrailers.blogspot.com
Indian students pose with the supercheap 'Aakash' Tablet computers which they received during its launch in New Delhi, India yesterday.
New Delhi - India launched what it dubbed the world's cheapest tablet computer on Wednesday, to be sold to students at the subsidised price of $35 and later in shops for about $60.
Most of India's 1.2 billion people are poor and products such as Apple Inc's iPad are beyond the reach even of many in the fast-growing middle class.
“The rich have access to the digital world, the poor and ordinary have been excluded. Aakash will end that digital divide,” Telecoms and Education Minister Kapil Sibal said.
The government is buying the first units of the lightweight touch-screen device, called Aakash, or “sky” in Hindi, for $50 each from a British company that is assembling the web-enabled devices in India.
A pilot run of 100 000 units will be given to students for free, with the first 500 handed out at the launch to a mixed response. It supports video conferencing, has two USB ports and a three-hour battery life but some users said it was slow.
India has a reputation for creating affordable products that are easy to use and sturdy enough to handle its rugged environment - from Tata Motors' $2 000 Nano car to generic versions of pharmaceuticals.
Two years in development, the paperback book-sized Aakash may help the government's goal of incorporating information technology in education, although critics were doubtful of its mass appeal.
Despite being a leader in software and IT services, India trails fellow BRIC nations Brazil, Russia and China in the drive to get the masses connected to the internet and cellphones, a report by risk analysis firm Maplecroft said this year.
The number of internet users grew 15-fold between 2000 and 2010 in India, according to another recent report. Still, just 8 percent of Indians have access. That compares with nearly 40 percent in China.
The Aakash is aimed at university students for digital learning via a government platform that distributes electronic books and courses.
Testing included running video for two hours in temperatures of 48 degrees Celsius to mimic a northern Indian summer, said DataWind, the small London-based company that developed the tablet with the Indian Institute of Technology.
Rajat Agrawal, executive editor of gadget reviewers BGR India, said the 660 mhz processor from US company Conexant Systems was “decent” for the price, but warned the machine seemed slow and the touch screen not very agile.
“Because of the price there is a lot of excitement,” he said. “People might use it initially but if it is not user friendly they will give up within a week.”
The device uses resistive LCD displays rather than a full touch screen and connects via wireless broadband. DataWind CEO Suneet Singh said future versions would include a mobile phone connection, making it more useful in rural areas.
The launch last week of Amazon's Kindle Fire shook up the global tablet market, with its $199 price tag and slick browser a serious threat to Apple's iPad.
Like the Kindle Fire, the Aakash uses the Google Android operating system.
Some of the mainly middle-class technology department students at the event said it needed refinement but was a good option for the poor.
“It could be better,” said Nikant Vohra, an electrical engineering student. “If you see it from the price only, it's okay, but we have laptops and have used iPads, so we know the difference.”
Some 19 million people subscribe to cellphones every month, making India the world's fastest growing market, but most are from the wealthier segment of the population in towns. - Reuters


Reuters) - India launched what it dubbed the world's cheapest tablet computer Wednesday, to be sold to students at the subsidized price of $35 and later in shops for about $60.

Most of India's 1.2 billion people are poor and products such as Apple Inc's iPad are beyond the reach even of many in the fast-growing middle class.

"The rich have access to the digital world, the poor and ordinary have been excluded. Aakash will end that digital divide," Telecoms and Education Minister Kapil Sibal said.

The government is buying the first units of the lightweight touch-screen device, called Aakash, or "sky" in Hindi, for $50 each from a British company which is assembling the web-enabled devices in India.

A pilot run of 100,000 units will be given to students for free, with the first 500 handed out at the launch to a mixed response. It supports video conferencing, has two USB ports and a three-hour battery life but some users said it was slow.
India has a reputation for creating affordable products that are easy to use and sturdy enough to handle its rugged environment -- from Tata Motors' $2,000 Nano car to generic versions of pharmaceuticals.
Two years in development, the paperback book-sized Aakash may help the government's goal of incorporating information technology in education, although critics were doubtful of its mass appeal.
Despite being a leader in software and IT services, India trails fellow BRIC nations Brazil, Russia and China in the drive to get the masses connected to the Internet and mobile phones, a report by risk analysis firm Maplecroft said this year.
The number of Internet users grew 15-fold between 2000 and 2010 in India, according to another recent report. Still, just 8 percent of Indians have access. That compares with nearly 40 percent inChina.
The Aakash is aimed at university students for digital learning via a government platform that distributes electronic books and courses.
Testing included running video for two hours in temperatures of 48 degrees Celsius (118 degrees Fahrenheit) to mimic a northern Indian summer, said DataWind, the small London-based company that developed the tablet with the Indian Institute of Technology.
Rajat Agrawal, executive editor of gadget reviewers BGR India, said the 660 mhz processor from U.S. company Conexant Systems was "decent" for the price, but warned the machine seemed slow and the touch screen not very agile.
"Because of the price there is a lot of excitement," he said. "People might use it initially but if it is not user friendly they will give up within a week."
After first giving them out for free, the government aims to sell them to students for $35 next year. A retail version will be sold in Indian shops for about $60.
The device uses resistive LCD displays rather than a full touch screen and connects via wireless broadband. DataWind CEO Suneet Singh said future versions would include a mobile phone connection, making it more useful in rural areas.
The launch last week of Amazon's Kindle Fire shook up the global tablet market, with its $199 price tag and slick browser a serious threat to Apple's iPad.
Like the Kindle Fire, the Aakash uses the Google Android operating system.
Some of the mainly middle-class technology department students at the event said it needed refinement but was a good option for the poor.
"It could be better," said Nikant Vohra, an electrical engineering student. "If you see it from the price only, it's okay, but we have laptops and have used iPads, so we know the difference."
Some 19 million people subscribe to mobile phones every month, making India the world's fastest growing market, but most are from the wealthier segment of the population in towns.

India launches world’s cheapest tablet PC

The world’s cheapest tablet PC, priced at around Rs. 1,200, will now be available to students in the country as part of the government’s programme to expand education through information technology.
The tablet PC, named Aakash, will cost the government Rs. 2,276. It will be given to students after subsidising the price by up to 50 per cent, Human Resources Development Minister Kapil Sibal said on Wednesday while unveiling the device in New Delhi.
“The tablet is for Rs. 2,276 which includes taxes and cost of transportation. The government will provide subsidy of 50 per cent to institutes buying it. It will cost around Rs. 1,100-Rs 1,200 to institutes,” Mr. Sibal said.
An initial order of 1 lakh devices has been placed with device maker Datawind, Mr. Sibal said. The procurement order will be scaled up later with an aim to bringing down prices further, he added.
“If 10 lakh pieces are ordered, then it will be priced at Rs. 1,750 (cost to the government) which will include transportation cost and vendor’s profit as well. So, I have fulfilled my promise of USD 35 tablet,” Mr. Sibal said.
Mr. Sibal said he will ask telecom vendor ITI to manufacture it and will seek support of other industry players to scale up the production and reduce costs.


Videos of Akash

Indian 35 $ Tablet - better than IPAD



India Demos $35 Tablet Computer for Rural Poor




Indian Tablet for college students costs only $32


              

    Aakash tablet pc Full review Cheap tablet pc @40$

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